French Toast Breakfast Recipe for Two

French toast is a family breakfast favourite which has been around for practically forever. Believed to have been created as a way to make stale bread more pleasant to eat today it is served in the finest of restaurants and has become a breakfast meal which is popular with people of all ages.

Although the recipe is basically always prepared in a similar manner this dish if often referred to by many different names. It may be called sweet bread, German bread, French toast, Eggy bread, Golden bread, Lost bread, as well as a few other terms depending on which country you dine in.

French toast is simple to prepare, absolutely positively delicious, and not so shabby on the nutritious side of things either. It is quick and easy to prepare and a morning fare that mom can generally get the kids to eat quite willingly, which makes this recipe a popular morning meal for families. 
See lower for the printable PDF of this recipe.

Pour between 1/4 cup of milk and 1/2 cup of milk into a rounded plate. Add one to two eggs.

Add about one teaspoon of cinnamon (optional) then whisk your ingredients together.

Dip your bread into the mixture then flip it over so that both sides of the bread are soaked.


Cook over medium heat in a preheated buttered frying pan. Don't forget to flip it so both sides of your French toast cook up nice and toasty.


If you find your toast has a tendency to be soggy there is a simple solution. This issue can occur for one of two reasons: Either you have soaked your bread for too long or you have cooked your french toast too quickly so that it did not have a chance to cook on the inside. Just keep your heat a little lower next time and slow cook your french toast. (Lol...harder to wait for it but definitely worth the wait.)

(Each individual serving generally consists of 2 slices of french toast per person)

Ingredients:
4 slices bread
2 eggs
1/4 cup milk
1 teaspoon cinnamon (optional)

Directions:
1. Combine your milk, eggs, and cinnamon together in a deep dish plate. Whisk to mix.

2. Heat a frying pan over medium-low heat. Add butter into the pan. 

3. Dip a slice of bread into the milk and egg mix and put into the frying pan to cook. If your pan is large enough you can cook 2 slices each time.

4. Flip your french toast so it cooks on the other side.

5. Serve with a topping of your choice. Popular french toast toppings include:
Butter
Syrup
Powdered sugar
Jam
Fruit
Apple sauce
Walnuts
Whipped cream
Cinnamon and sugar

Note: The amount of milk you use may vary depending on the number of people you are serving and also on how large your mixing plate is so adapt the recipe as needed.

A Little French Toast History Lesson

The tradition of soaking bead in a milk and egg mixture originated somewhere way back in the 4th or 5th century but contrary to popular belief this dish did not originate in France and nor is it of French origin. 

No one really knows who invented French toast but it is believed to have been created as a means of making stale bread palatable. The French referred to this meal as "Lost bread" because it was a means of softening stale bread into a much more appetizing food for consumption. 

It was referred to by Westerners as German bread up until WW1 when with logical reasoning this became an unpopular term for this meal. The name was then changed to French toast but as stated previously this pan toasted bread goes by many terms and how you refer to it will depend largely upon your culture or country.

Nutritional Facts: French toast does qualify as a nutritious breakfast but this credited largely to the egg and milk which is coated onto, and into the bread. A single slice of French bread when it is made with 2% milk has about 149 calories. It contains protein, calcium, vitamin A, and iron. Using whole wheat bread and adding the antioxidant rich cinnamon to your mix will increase the health benefits of this popular breakfast fare. 

 Where things generally get out of hand in the calorie department for French toast is with the addition of syrup, brown sugar, jam, or icing sugar as toppings. Don't load the sweet stuff too heavy on your plate and you won't have to feel guilty about having that second piece. Yummy!

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